That's My IL

What does “That’s My IL” mean? It means something different to each person who comes through our doors. IL philosophy values dignity, resourcefulness, and freedom of choice for all people with disabilities. The way someone overcomes barriers to living independently is a core part of what “That’s My IL” stands for. It is the personal journey that leads someone to becoming more independent, examples include: learning how to use the public transit system, advocating for personal needs, requesting an accommodation at work, or getting an accessible apartment. That’s My IL stories are here to celebrate the strength of ingenuity that lives in the disability world.

Do you have a story to share? Call Independence, Inc., at 701-839-4724.

Ed Casias

Looking Forward and Living Independently

Nancy Stute, Nursing Facility Transition Coordinator. 


I would like to tell you about the success of transitioning Edward Casias to his new home. This young man lived in the Bottineau Good Samaritan Society for 2 years due to 3 amputation surgeries. He had to learn to walk again with prosthetics through extensive therapy.  It was a huge success at the age of 59. Shortly after starting out in his new apartment, Ed had to go to the emergency room. He was diagnosed with pneumonia and was sent back to the Bottineau Good Samaritan to get well again. In his few more weeks at the nursing home, Ed did not one time give up and was still set on going back to community living. So with a little more education and assistance again, Ed was discharged to his apartment in Rolette County.  

I am very proud of what Ed has overcome during his transition to independent living and more importantly, Ed is also proud of himself. Ed decided to not have a helper come in for assisting him with activities of daily living and continues to grow in many areas. He is confident in setting up his medications, picking up the meds at the pharmacy, cooking, cleaning, and personal care. He is also happy to be sleeping much better in his own bed. He has been in good spirits after he was approved for an apartment. His happiness led to strength and great results at doctor visits and he has even overcome his fight with smoking. Ed feels without smoking, he can exercise more and breathe better. He does admit to eating more sweets sometimes. Ed says, “I do what I am supposed to, to be successful”. With that, as a team the coordinator and Ed had to battle the Social Security office, as no one can live on $30 a month. It was about a 2 month battle, but when we finally got through to the right people who could understand the situation, the case was expedited and solved. This was another success that we celebrated upon Ed returning to community living. Now without the stress of income and health, Ed has been able to maintain independence by doing everything on his own from his discharge date.

Ed shares with me that he is thankful for his apartment and furnishings provided by the Money Follows the Person Program (MFP). Ed states, “I feel the MFP Program has allowed me to start life over again and now I can look forward, rather than backwards”. Ed was thankful for his transition coordinator helping set up his meds and going through them one-on-one on the doses and times. Ed also is thankful for the change in relationships that the transition has sparked. Ed is now in more contact with his son, brothers, and the rest of the family. In Ed’s words, “Persistence paid off!” He has now been out on his own since January 19, 2016 and lives life to the fullest. 



Ed Casias

Looking Forward and Living Independently

Nancy Stute, Nursing Facility Transition Coordinator. 


I would like to tell you about the success of transitioning Edward Casias to his new home. This young man lived in the Bottineau Good Samaritan Society for 2 years due to 3 amputation surgeries. He had to learn to walk again with prosthetics through extensive therapy.  It was a huge success at the age of 59. Shortly after starting out in his new apartment, Ed had to go to the emergency room. He was diagnosed with pneumonia and was sent back to the Bottineau Good Samaritan to get well again. In his few more weeks at the nursing home, Ed did not one time give up and was still set on going back to community living. So with a little more education and assistance again, Ed was discharged to his apartment in Rolette County.  

I am very proud of what Ed has overcome during his transition to independent living and more importantly, Ed is also proud of himself. Ed decided to not have a helper come in for assisting him with activities of daily living and continues to grow in many areas. He is confident in setting up his medications, picking up the meds at the pharmacy, cooking, cleaning, and personal care. He is also happy to be sleeping much better in his own bed. He has been in good spirits after he was approved for an apartment. His happiness led to strength and great results at doctor visits and he has even overcome his fight with smoking. Ed feels without smoking, he can exercise more and breathe better. He does admit to eating more sweets sometimes. Ed says, “I do what I am supposed to, to be successful”. With that, as a team the coordinator and Ed had to battle the Social Security office, as no one can live on $30 a month. It was about a 2 month battle, but when we finally got through to the right people who could understand the situation, the case was expedited and solved. This was another success that we celebrated upon Ed returning to community living. Now without the stress of income and health, Ed has been able to maintain independence by doing everything on his own from his discharge date.

Ed shares with me that he is thankful for his apartment and furnishings provided by the Money Follows the Person Program (MFP). Ed states, “I feel the MFP Program has allowed me to start life over again and now I can look forward, rather than backwards”. Ed was thankful for his transition coordinator helping set up his meds and going through them one-on-one on the doses and times. Ed also is thankful for the change in relationships that the transition has sparked. Ed is now in more contact with his son, brothers, and the rest of the family. In Ed’s words, “Persistence paid off!” He has now been out on his own since January 19, 2016 and lives life to the fullest. 





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